Where Angles Fear to Tread

September 19, 2014

Still united

Filed under: Uncategorized — Obtuse Angle @ 4:49 am

With only the last few results to come in, the result is being called for No. The margin looks to be solid enough to rule out a Quebec-style neverendum, but nonetheless Yes clearly represents a very large minority in Scotland.

No doubt there will be a push now from some to maintain the status quo, but there is at the very least a real chance this will fail. Scotland will demand the extra powers promised to them in the panicky last days of the Better Together campaign. England , convinced that it’s deal is getting worse all the time (and decreasingly inclined to prop up what they see as an ungrateful Scotland) will finally insist on an answer to the West Lothian question. UKIP will capitalise on the feeling of unfairness to feed their anti-politics message, the Tory backbenches sense a chance to cripple Labour with EVEM or an English Parliament, and the Lib Dems will demand a Constitutional Convention so they can dust off their several millions of pages of plans to rebuild the system. Oh, and then there’s Wales and NI.

I expect this will rumble on through the conference season, into the Clacton by-election, and beyond, but these are now matters for another day. For now, sleep calls.

The battle’s done, and we (kinda) won, so we sound our victory cheer.
Where do we go from here?

17/32 declared

Filed under: Uncategorized — Right Angle @ 3:47 am

Half the areas declared, and about 25% of the electorate. The ‘No’ campaign leads with 56%, and 122,000 votes. We now await for the larger cities to declare results. We won’t know until Glasgow / Edinburgh declares.

Meanwhile, our cousins across the pond at the New York Times, are not covering this in quite the same detail as they do their own elections, with an automatic feed link with STV’s twitter feed being the only action on the site! There may not be quite as much international interest as we were previously led to believe.

– Right Angle

Dundee Votes Yes

Filed under: Uncategorized — Right Angle @ 3:00 am

The first result for the Yes campaign is in the Yes ‘Stronghold’ of Dundee. Yes votes almost 14,000 more than the No campaign. Brings the count closer, but no panic yet (I hope)

Yes: 172,426

No:   178,811

– Right Angle

Union Status Update

Filed under: Uncategorized — Right Angle @ 2:45 am

Unlike previous elections, I’ve been unable to stay up all night, so I’ve set the alarm bright and early (and it appears dark outside); and woken at 3:30am to ensure that the Union is safe and, well, united.

First thoughts:

Yes: 63,340        No: 76,864

5/32 areas declared

Huge turnout in areas so far (topping 91%).

Still, we await the results of the larger conurbations but looking okay so far.

Indyref Fallout (part 1)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Obtuse Angle @ 2:12 am

As the results start to trickle in, and initial indications are that the Union is safe (in some form or other), thoughts start to turn to what comes next. The most immediately obvious point of note is the turnout, with even the most apathetic areas hitting 75%, and the keenest turning out over 90%. So in what is supposed to be an age of disengagement and dissilusionment, why this blip? Unlike most votes, two conditions are simultaneously true:

1) People’s votes count. Unlike most plurality (FPTP) contests in a general election, every voter matters.

2) People care about the outcome. A fair voting system isn’t enough to drive turnout, voters have to actually care about the result. Turnout in the AV referendum (a subject which (depressingly) most of the electorate didn’t understand, let alone have the slightest interest in) scarcely topped 40%.

For an example of the opposite, we need look no further than the recent PCC by-election (a safe seat and what many biters consider a non-job), which struggled to get to double figures.

So if you care about turnout, offer people real influence over things they care about. How to achieve this is a question for another, more civilised time.

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